• Dr. Jamal Salameh M.D.
  • Dr. Jamal Salameh M.D.

    I always wanted to help people by being a doctor. I hope my patients feel that I am empathetic, intelligent, and genuinely concerned when we are together for a visit. I truly enjoy seeing them get better!

Hemodialysis

Hemodialysis

Hemodialysis is a process that uses a man-made membrane (dialyzer) to: Remove wastes,...
High Blood Pressure

High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is a common disease in which blood flows through blood vessels...
Kidney Dialysis

Kidney Dialysis

Kidney dialysis is a life-support treatment that uses a special machine to filter...
Kidney Stones

Kidney Stones

A small, hard deposit that forms in the kidneys and is often painful when passed...
Kidney Transplant

Kidney Transplant

A kidney transplant is a surgical procedure to place a kidney from a live or deceased...
Peritoneal Dialysis

Peritoneal Dialysis

Peritoneal dialysis differs from hemodialysis, a more commonly used blood-filtering...
  • Hemodialysis
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Kidney Dialysis
  • Kidney Stones
  • Kidney Transplant
  • Peritoneal Dialysis
  • Hemodialysis

    Hemodialysis is a process that uses a man-made membrane (dialyzer) to: Remove wastes, such as urea, from the blood. Restore the proper balance of electrolytes in the blood. Eliminate extra fluid from the body.

    Description

    • Routine hemodialysis is conducted in a dialysis outpatient facility, either a purpose built room in a hospital or a dedicated, stand alone clinic.
    • Hemodialysis is the most common method used to treat advanced and permanent kidney failure.
    • Hemodialysis is done in a hospital dialysis unit where nurses, nephrologists and other medical support staff are available.

    Information

    Hemodialysis is the most common way to treat advanced kidney failure. The procedure can help you carry on an active life despite failing kidneys. Hemodialysis requires you to follow a strict treatment schedule, take medications regularly and, usually, make changes in your diet.

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  • High Blood Pressure

    High blood pressure is a common disease in which blood flows through blood vessels (arteries) at higher than normal pressures.

    Description

    More than 3 million US cases per year

    • Treatable by a medical professional
    • Requires a medical diagnosis
    • Lab tests or imaging not required
    • Chronic: can last for years or be lifelong

    Information

    Usually hypertension is defined as blood pressure above 140/90, and is considered severe if the pressure is above 180/120.

    High blood pressure often has no symptoms. Over time, if untreated, it can cause health conditions, such as heart disease and stroke.

    Eating a healthier diet with less salt, exercising regularly, and taking medications can help lower blood pressure.

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  • Kidney Dialysis

    Kidney dialysis is a life-support treatment that uses a special machine to filter harmful wastes, salt, and excess fluid from your blood. This restores the blood to a normal, healthy balance. Dialysis replaces many of the kidney's important functions.

    Description

    • Dialysis is the artificial process of eliminating waste (diffusion) and unwanted water (ultrafiltration) from the blood. Our kidneys do this naturally. Some people, however, may have failed or damaged kidneys which cannot carry out the function properly - they may need dialysis.
    • It also helps control blood pressure and regulates important chemicals in the blood, such as sodium (salt) and potassium. When your kidneys don't perform these functions due to disease or injury, dialysis can help purify the blood and remove waste. Learn more about the kidneys using Healthline's Body Maps.

    Information

    Dialysis is a treatment that does some of the things done by healthy kidneys. It is needed when your own kidneys can no longer take care of your body's needs.

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  • Kidney Stones

    A small, hard deposit that forms in the kidneys and is often painful when passed.

    Description

    More than 200,000 US cases per year

    • Treatable by a medical professional
    • Requires a medical diagnosis
    • Lab tests or imaging often required
    • Short-term: resolves within days to weeks

    Information

    Kidney stones are hard deposits of minerals and acid salts that stick together in concentrated urine. They can be painful when passing through the urinary tract, but usually don't cause permanent damage.

    The most common symptom is severe pain, usually in the side of the abdomen, that's often associated with nausea.

    Treatment includes pain relievers and drinking lots of water to help pass the stone. Medical procedures may be needed to remove or break up larger stones.

  • Kidney Transplant

    A kidney transplant is a surgical procedure to place a kidney from a live or deceased donor into a person whose kidneys no longer function properly. Your kidneys remove excess fluid and waste from your blood.

    Description

    • A kidney transplant is a surgical procedure to place a kidney from a live or deceased donor into a person whose kidneys no longer function properly.
    • Your kidneys remove excess fluid and waste from your blood. When your kidneys lose their filtering ability, dangerous levels of fluid and waste accumulate in your body — a condition known as kidney failure or end-stage kidney disease. A kidney transplant is often the best treatment for kidney failure.
    • Only one donated kidney is needed to replace two failed kidneys, making living-donor kidney transplantation an option. If a compatible living donor isn't available for a kidney transplant, your name may be placed on a kidney transplant waiting list to receive a kidney from a deceased donor. The wait is usually a few years.

    Information

    Chronic kidney disease, often caused by diabetes or high blood pressure, is the gradual loss of kidney function. Early detection and treatment can help.

    Glomerulonephritis affects your kidneys' filtering function. Complications include high blood pressure, protein in the urine (proteinuria) and kidney failure.

  • Peritoneal Dialysis

    Peritoneal dialysis differs from hemodialysis, a more commonly used blood-filtering procedure. With peritoneal dialysis, you can give yourself treatments at home, at work or while traveling. You may be able to use fewer medications and eat a less restrictive diet than you can with hemodialysis.

    Description

    • Peritoneal dialysis (per-ih-tuh-NEE-ul di-AL-uh-sis) is a way to remove waste products from your blood when your kidneys can no longer do the job adequately. During peritoneal dialysis, blood vessels in your abdominal lining (peritoneum) fill in for your kidneys, with the help of a fluid (dialysate) that flows into and out of the peritoneal space.
    • The blood does not leave the body, so no needles are involved. Instead, a tube called a PD catheter is placed in the belly, and the dialysis process happens by sterile fluid flowing through the lining of the belly (called the peritoneum). Blood is cleaned inside the body.
    • Hemodialysis uses a man-made membrane (dialyzer) to filter wastes and remove extra fluid from the blood. Peritoneal dialysis uses the lining of the abdominal cavity (peritoneal membrane) and a solution (dialysate) to remove wastes and extra fluid from the body.

    How peritoneal dialysis works

    Approximately 2 litres of dialysis fluid is infused into the abdomen through a special tube called a PD catheter. This process is called ’infusion’. The cleaning process uses the membrane in your abdomen as a natural filter. Waste products and excess water are removed from your body into the dialysis fluid through the peritoneal membrane. This process is called ’dwell time’. After 4-12 hours, this fluid is drained from your abdomen in a process named ‘drainage’, which takes about 20-30 minutes. After that, new sterile fluid is instilled into your abdomen and the process starts all over again. This process of draining out the old fluid and instilling new fluid is called an ‘exchange’ and is done mainly by gravity. Except for the time spent during these exchanges — on average 30-40 minutes, 3-5 times a day — the rest of the day you are free to do whatever you want (e.g. work, study or even travel).

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  • Hemodialysis
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Kidney Dialysis
  • Kidney Stones
  • Kidney Transplant
  • Peritoneal Dialysis
First Coast Nephrology

Dr. Jamal Salameh M.D.

Dr. Jamal Salameh M.D.

I always wanted to help people by being a doctor. I hope my patients feel that I am empathetic, intelligent, and genuinely concerned when we are together for a visit. I truly enjoy seeing them get better!

Professional Experience

2012 - Present

First Coast Nephrology

Jacksonville, Florida (President)

2002 - 2010

First Coast Hospitalists

Jacksonville, Florida (President)

Lead a team of physicians and advanced practitioners to provide a full spectrum of internal medicine services ranging from the intensive care unit through rehabilitation. Serve as internal medicine liaison to the transition team at St. Luke’s/St. Vincent’s hospital. Also serve as a member of both the peer review and medical staff development committees.

2005 - 2010

Southpoint Terrace Rehabilitation Center

Jacksonville, Florida (Associate Medical Director)

2003 - 2005

Internal Medicine Associates

Jacksonville, Florida (Partner)

Provision of full time inpatient and outpatient internal medicine services. Participated in experiential rotations for University of North Florida ARNP program.

Need Help?

Dr. Jamal Salameh is a nephrologist in Jacksonville, Florida and is affiliated with multiple hospitals in the area, including Baptist Medical Center and Orange Park Medical Center. He received his medical degree from Northeast Ohio Medical University and has been in practice for 16 years. He is one of 25 doctors at Baptist Medical Center and one of 14 at Orange Park Medical Center who specialize in Nephrology.

Contact

Office Locations

Jacksonville

2732 Trollie Lane
Jacksonville, FL 32211


Orange Park

1665 Kingsley Avenue (Suite 108)
Orange Park, FL 32073


Macclenny

159 N 3rd Street
Macclenny, FL 32063

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